Another WoW-Tourist takes a look at Warhammer Online

Mengtzu, a self-acknowedged WoW-Tourist, reviews his experiences in Warhammer Online in a thread on rpg.net. He’s not just a fly by night tourist either, his Disciple of Khaine reached maximum level in the game. He also spots a downside to the living guilds mechanic by which guilds can level up and gain access for members to special teleports, guild auctions, and the like.

It is awkward for members of a small guild that cannot level quickly; your social choice has cut you off not only from the endgame elite, but basic conveniences that any character can access in other games.

There are a lot of screenshots in the thread, and although he likes a lot of things about the game, he ends by concluding that while WAR beats the 5-year old WoW content handily, it still isn’t a match for Blizzard’s more recent innovations or expansion zones. For example, back in the day it would not have been unusual for NPCs to narrate something that happened in the player’s absence. Now with phasing, WoW players expect to be there and to watch events unfold before them.

Read it and see what you think. In some ways it makes gloomy reading, he’s very objective about explaining why he liked or disliked different things, but you can see why it’s so hard for new games to play WoW at its strengths unless Blizzard really screws the pooch sometime in future.

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7 thoughts on “Another WoW-Tourist takes a look at Warhammer Online

  1. Did you notice that joke about opening the inventory with “I” instead of “B” – Guild Wars does that.
    There are also games out there that have click to move (Aion, Guild Wars, most eastern games), and players find it annoying even if they can switch it off.

    Generation Warcraft – hardwired to a certain control scheme?

  2. I could not resist and almost wrote a beginner’s starter guide for Mengtzu’s next tourist game, LOTRO.

    I wish I would not have told him that the human starting experience is supposedly the best…

    I am too lazy to play dwarf at the moment. Massively has already someone playing a Hobbit, so I guess I would like to read his report about an Elven or Dwarven char.

    I guess the broken hips of LOTRO were the early and futile western try to create something like the elegant and super sexy hip swing of an Aion Sorceress back in the days…

  3. It seemed remarkably positive for what I took to be a negative review. Or was it negative for a review that still said to try it? Either way, I’m glad I read it, though if I go sight-seeing I’m morely tikely to try LOTRO anyway.

    • I think it was a really good writeup both of the things he liked and hated. I just don’t think he really picked up on what a good casual PvP game it is (ie. one of it’s strengths passed him by), prolly because like he says, he’s not a big PvP player.

  4. It was a good review.

    Note also that he touched on what seem to be the growing consensus reason for WAR’s failure — it is perhaps the most population dependent MMOG ever created. Or at least the most population dependent big-budget MMOG ever created.

    WAR doesn’t merely need people, it needs people spread throughout its four tiers, in roughly equal proportions per faction. But, oh yeah, you can’t have too many people in a T4 zone, because that’ll lag everyone out or even crash them all to desktop. And class/faction balance, instead of being merely a source of passionate argument, becomes completely gamebreaking.

    Should have mirrored all classes straight across (which, I gather, is what Aion does) and held the line against premature server expansion at launch (yeah, that’s a hard one to get right, but it isn’t impossible — Turbine launched LOTRO with the same number of NA servers that the game has ever had — EU might be the same — and EA/Mythic should have known that WotLK was going to draw away again pretty quick). That still wouldn’t have fixed the T4 lag/crash problems, but would have at least bought them some time/money.

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