Blizzard were right to hold Blizzcon this year

We’re in the middle of a cold snap here, which makes it feel all too appropriate to be talking about Blizzard. (I realise that I have been very WoW-focussed here lately – I honestly don’t have time to play many games at the moment so it’s easier for me to stick to what I know.)

So Blizzcon 2010 is being held this weekend. We’ve had a few interesting snippets of news so far which I’ll touch on in more detail tomorrow and next week, but nothing huge. That is news in itself because up until this year, Blizzcon always centred around a big announcement.

  • 2005 – First WoW expansion: The Burning Crusade
  • 2007 – Second WoW expansion: Wrath of the Lich King
  • 2008 – Starcraft 2 Trilogy Announced
  • 2008 – Diablo 3 announced at Blizzard Worldwide Invitational, first D3 class (Wizard) announced at Blizzcon
  • 2009 – Third Wow expansion: Cataclysm

Chris Metzen apparently said in an interview (which hopefully will be available at some point) that the Blizzard team discussed whether or not to hold Blizzcon this year, in view of the fact that they didn’t have any big announcements to make. They decided to go ahead because it was so popular with the fans.

My first reaction on reading this was to think, “No, they should have kept Blizzcon for special announcements and just skipped a year if there wasn’t anything going on. People will be going based on wanting to be there for a big announcement.”

But really, although being able to associate Blizzcon with news is nice for bloggers and journalists, the convention works far better as a huge official get together for fans. For a company who is often criticised for not paying enough attention to their own fanbase, I think Blizzard made the right decision to go ahead with this one. And alongside that decision is an implied commitment to stage Blizzcon every year from now on.

A lot of fans won’t remember that there never used to be an annual Blizzcon, and would have expected it to be a yearly event. They’ll now be correct in that assumption.

Now we can get on with wondering whether they’ll ever hold it outside the US …